African Raptors

The online home of African Raptor interests

African Raptors header image 1

Links

1) The Peregrine Fund

5668 West Flying Hawk Lane Boise Idaho 83709 USA

E: tpf@peregrinefund.org        www.peregrinefund.org

The Peregrine Fund was established in 1970 and works nationally and internationally, to conserve birds of prey in nature. We conserve nature by achieving results–results restoring species in jeopardy, conserving habitat, educating students, training conservationists, providing factual information to the public, and by accomplishing good science. We succeed through cooperation and hard-work, using common sense, being hands-on and non-political, and by emphasizing solutions.

2) Global Raptors Information Network

www.globalraptors.org

The Global Raptor Information Network (“GRIN”) is designed to provide information on diurnal raptors (hawks, eagles, and falcons) and to facilitate communication between raptor researchers and organizations interested in the conservation of these species.

3) Natural Research Ltd. 

Brathens Business Park, Glassel Banchory Aberdeenshire AB31 4BY Scotland

Web: www.natural-research.org

Natural Research is currently involved with studies on the Madagascar fish eagle (Madagascar) and the Black harrier (South Africa).

 

4) Raptor Research Foundation

Web: http://raptorresearchfoundation.org

 

The Raptor Research Foundation distributes the annual Leslie Brown Research Award to support studies on African raptors.

 

5) Acopian Center for Conservation Science, Hawk Mountain Sanctuary

410 Summer Valley Road, Orwigsburg, PA  17961 USA

E: bildstein@hawkmtn.org   www.hawkmountain.org

Hawk Mountain Sanctuary Association is the largest and oldest member-based raptor conservation organization in the world.  Founded in 1934 to stop the slaughter of hawks migrating along the Kittatinny Ridge in the Central Appalachian Mountains of easternPennsylvania, USA, the Sanctuary remains focused on its principal mission of protecting both common and endangered migratory birds of prey and the habitats upon which they depend. 

Today Hawk Mountain maintains the longest and most complete record of raptor migration in existence.  In mid-20th Century, this invaluable resource was used by conservationists, including Rachel Carson, to document pesticide-era declines in North American populations of raptors including Bald Eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) and Peregrine Falcons (Falco peregrinus). 

6) NatureSomaliland.

Hargeisa, Somaliland; www.naturesomaliland.com (under construction).

Bird conservation in Somaliland/Somalia. Currently researching the almost total disappearance of five out of six of our vulture species. Only the Hooded, N. monachus, is extant in excellent numbers.

7) Kestreling.com

PO Box 287, Simon’s Town, 7995, South Africa, E: antman@iafrica.com, Web: http://www.kestreling.com

Kestreling.com is involved with research on kestrels.  Key projects include ecological research on a breeding population of the Rock Kestrel (Falco rupicolus) in the Western Cape of South Africa and co-ordinating the Migrating Kestrel Project of the Birds of Prey Working Group of the Endangered Wildlife Trust.  The Migrating Kestrel Project’s aims are to estimate the population size of Lesser Kestrels, Amur Falcons and Redfooted Falcons in Africa, with the ultimate aim of conserving these species while wintering in Africa.  Kestreling.com also hosts a collection of photographs of all the species of kestrels around the world.

8)  Endangered Wildlife Trust: Birds of Prey Working Group.

Private Bag X 11, Parkview, 2122, SOUTH AFRICA

André Botha : andreb@ewt.org.za (manager of the working group)

Web: https://www.ewt.org.za/workgroups_overview.aspx?group=raptor&page=overview

Birds of Prey Working Group (BoPWG) 
The Birds of Prey Working Group actions conservation projects for the diurnal and nocturnal raptors of southern Africa. An amalgamation between the EWT’s Raptor Conservation and Vulture Study Groups brought about this Working Group and strengthened the effectiveness of the birds of prey conservation network in the sub continent.

 

 

 

3 Comments

3 Comments so far ↓

  • Professor Aron Parker

    Oh yes. I am residing in Cape Town. Do you know of anybody that is nearby.

  • Graham Smith

    Hi

    Great site, keep up the first rate work.
    And pass on our greetings to Robbie Whytock, it’s been a long time hope you are still enjoying yourself.

  • Dr Satya Prakash Mehra

    I would like to know the birders/ researchers (avian fauna/ornithology) from Sudan who are available in Khartoum.

    I am in Khartoum for short period.

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